Management determines selling price of feeder calves

 Resize text         Printer-friendly version of this article Printer-friendly version of this article

Management is the judicious use of means to accomplish an end. For beef cattle operations, the accomplished end is a product that can be sold for a profit. It’s the management applied that determines the price of your feeder calves, not the buyers at the sale barn. Listed are a number of management practices than can reduce the selling price of feeder calves.

• If management sells calves one head at a time, management can expect a discount of $4.79 per cwt. compared to calves sold in groups larger than five.

• If management decides not to castrate bull calves, management can expect a discount of $6.31 per cwt. compared to the selling price of steer calves.

• If management decides not to dehorn or eliminate horns due to genetics, management can expect a discount of $8.03 per cwt.

• If management decides to place calves on long-term creep feed resulting in a calf that is fleshy or fat, management can expect a $6.13 to $13.96 per cwt. discount compared to feeder calves in average body condition.

• If management decides to sell a calf that is full or tanked, management can expect a discount of $6.86 to $15.95 per cwt. compared to a feeder calf in average fill.

• If management decides to produce calves that are small framed, management can expect a discount of $22.10 per cwt. compared to large- and medium framed feeder cattle.

• If management decides to produce calves that are light muscled (muscle score 3), management can expect a discount of $32.41 per cwt. compared to muscle score 1 feeder cattle.

Let’s not forget – who is management? Management is you – the producer. The decision you make and the management you apply determine the value of your calves on sale day. The selling price can be reduced due to discounts or increased due to premiums. The decision is yours. The data used in this article was collected from Arkansas sale barns in 2010.

For more articles from the University of Arkansas Batesville Station Livestock & Forestry newsletter, click here.



Comments (0) Leave a comment 

Name
e-Mail (required)
Location

Comment:

characters left


5E Series

Introduced in 2013, the new 85 and 100 hp John Deere 5085E and 5100E feature 4-cylinder Interim Tier 4 emissions-compliant ... Read More

View all Products in this segment

View All Buyers Guides

)
Feedback Form
Leads to Insight