Pros and cons of using forage preservatives

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The efforts to improve the management of forage storage will result in a good return to producer’s investment. Hay, haylage or silage preservatives will reduce storage losses from molds, bacteria and fungi, especially when the forage is harvested at higher moisture levels.

To help reduce those losses South Dakota State University Extension has listed the pros and cons of certain forage preservatives:

Organic acids

1. More expensive than inoculants.

2. Non-corrosive, buffered products are readily available.

3. Higher application rates gives better results.

4. May be stored and used at will.

 

Bacterial inoculants

1. Less expensive.

2. Easy to handle.

3. Not recommended for rained-on hay.

4. Not recommended for late-season hay.

5. Require uniform application for consistent results.

6. Must be applied immediately after mixing.

 

Enzymes

1. Less expensive.

2. Easy to handle.

3. Reduces fiber content.

4. Not recommended for rained-on hay.

5. Not recommended for late-season hay.

6. Does not directly ferment or prevent mold development.

7. Require uniform application for consistent results.

8. Must be applied immediately after mixing.



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