Rediscovering meadow fescue

 Resize text         Printer-friendly version of this article Printer-friendly version of this article

A farmer’s report of an unusual forage grass led Michael Casler, a USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) geneticist at the agency’s U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center in Madison, Wis., to identify the grass as meadow fescue. Meadow fescue has been long forgotten, although it was popular after being introduced about 50 to 60 years before tall fescue.

Casler has developed a new variety of meadow fescue called Hidden Valley, and its seed is being grown for future release. Meadow fescue is very winter-hardy and persistent, and seems to fit into today’s intensive-grazing operations. Geoffrey Brink, an ARS agronomist working with Casler, discovered that meadow fescue is 4 to 7 percent more digestible than other cool-season grasses dominant in the United States.

In another study, meadow fescue had a nutritional forage quality advantage over tall fescue and orchardgrass that may compensate for its slightly lower annual yield further north, as reported in the  Agronomy Journal. Also, the yield gap begins to close with the frequent harvesting involved in intensive grazing.



Comments (0) Leave a comment 

Name
e-Mail (required)
Location

Comment:

characters left


AG10 Series Silage Defacers

Loosen silage while maintaining a smooth, compacted bunker space resulting in better feed and less waste. This unique tool pierces, ... Read More

View all Products in this segment

View All Buyers Guides

)
Feedback Form
Leads to Insight