Research from the USDA shows that calves fed heat-treated colostrum from Johne’s-infected cows had lower incidence of Johne’s than calves fed raw colostrum from infected dams. However, heat treatment did not eliminate the risk. Some calves fed heat-treated colostrum from infected cows still contracted the disease.

At birth, researchers separated calves from infected dams into one of two treatment groups.

Calves in one group received raw colostrum from their dams, followed by three weeks of milk feeding from their dams. Calves in the other group received pooled, heat-treated colostrum, followed by three weeks of milk replacer. Colostrum was heated to and held at 149 Fahrenheit for 30 minutes.

Tissue samples cultured for the Johne’s organism  show a lower incidence of the disease in calves fed heat-treated colostrum. For complete study details, follow this link.