Why are farm kids so healthy?

 Resize text         Printer-friendly version of this article Printer-friendly version of this article

teens A new study from the National Farm Medicine Center seeks to find why farm kids are healthier than their city cousins.

According to the American Farm Bureau, the study will look at why childhood exposures unique to farm environments promote immunologic development that limits the severity of childhood allergic diseases and asthma.

The Center, along with the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, will follow 200 babies from the Marshfield, Wis., area over the next two years. Half of the babies will be from farm families and half from rural families not living on farms.

The study is being funded by a $5 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. For more information, call the study hotline at 1-800-512-5488.

Last year, another study found that kids who grow up on farms grow up with regular exposure to dust, pollen, animals and manure, which encourages a more robust immune system compared to the more hygienic city life. In fact, farm kids are 30 to 50 percent less likely to develop allergies or asthma than those who live in the city.



Comments (12) Leave a comment 

Name
e-Mail (required)
Location

Comment:

characters left

Karenh    
Colo  |  August, 13, 2013 at 09:09 AM

Last year, researchers found that kids who grow up on farms grow up with regular exposure to dust, pollen, animals and manure, which encourages a more robust immune system compared to the more hygienic city life. In fact, farm kids are 30 to 50 percent less likely to develop allergies or asthma than those who live in the city. Well, duh.

Debbie    
Ohio  |  August, 14, 2013 at 10:04 AM

Thank You!! My thoughts, exactly!!

Karen    
Mt Jackson VA  |  August, 13, 2013 at 09:15 AM

Perhaps the lack of excess chlorine and flouride salts in their water helps. Access to the sun, not always covered in sunscreen. More home grown vegetables and meats. Exercise. Duh. Not sure we need a $5 million study for that -- and if the federal government or its corporate friends fund the study, they will most certainly refute or underrate the "real" reasons I'm suggesting.

Ina    
Germany  |  August, 13, 2013 at 09:52 AM

yes, there are correlations between allergy and landscape. See http://www.asthma-allergy.de/studies.php?bereich_id=1

Clemens    
Bonn, Germany  |  August, 13, 2013 at 10:04 AM

the farm effect is well descripted here: http://www.en.uni-muenchen.de/news/sciencecasts/farm-effect/index.html

lisa    
August, 13, 2013 at 11:35 AM

I'd suggest that researchers include a third category, suburban. That's where kids are likely to grow up with the least exposure to bacteria etc. Indeed kids growing up with helicopter parents with their hand-sanitizer and Lysol households should be assessed separately.

IndianaJohn    
NW Indiana  |  August, 13, 2013 at 03:16 PM

These are the results of a $5 million study? I am offering detailed results plus case histories of the families in the study groups. All for 2.5 million. Think of the savings !

Alan    
Washington  |  August, 14, 2013 at 03:04 PM

I wouldn't be surprised if many of them drink raw milk and maybe eat fresh garden produce although many farmers don't have time to have a garden anymore.

Karen    
Cincinnati, Ohio  |  August, 15, 2013 at 08:12 PM

John, it's far worse than that. The article states what research has already "discovered". The $5 million is for a brand new 2-year study that will do nothing other than confirm the obvious. If our federal government wants to borrow $5 million from China to improve the health of US children, they might instead see what it would take to recruit and train neighborhood volunteers in urban and suburban areas (maybe bring some 4H'ers out from the countryside) and work side by side to teach the urban and suburban kids how to garden, care for animals, and entertain themselves outside. We don't need any more studies, we just need to find a way to pair the "haves" with the "have nots" and bring them back to basics - sunshine, dirt, real food, active lifestyles and a good night's sleep.

Nick    
Florida  |  August, 16, 2013 at 08:13 AM

I wonder if it matters what kind of farm

Herbert    
Colorado  |  August, 18, 2013 at 08:56 PM

Karen, I agree with you 100 0/0. Get back to the BASICS!!!!

Dan    
NW Illinois  |  August, 19, 2013 at 09:08 AM

When I was little I used to get really itchy around cats, dogs, and cows. Dad told me when I was about 8 that I could either stay in the house and not have any "fun" haha or tough it out and help him and have "fun". So i toughed it out and now I usually don't have any problems with working with the cattle!


BiG Pack 1290 HDP II

Krone North America presents the latest innovation in large square balers, the BiG Pack 1290 HDP II. This generation ... Read More

View all Products in this segment

View All Buyers Guides

Feedback Form
Leads to Insight