High Condition (Orange) High Risk of Terrorist Attack

Communication

  • Review clinical signs of foreign animal diseases (FAD’s) with all employees; and
  • Contact your private veterinarian, extension agent, or local industry organizations (contact numbers attached) for updates on situations, information, or actions needed.

Physical Security

  • Post signs outlining security procedures in place at your operation;
  • Ensure that all gates are locked; and
  • If possible, move your animals away from pastures located along major roads and away from areas where they cannot be adequately monitored.

Biosecurity

  • Consider canceling participation in shows, fairs, and exhibits;
  • If you must visit farms, wear disposable boots or rubber boots that can be disinfected;
  • Avoid livestock and poultry for at least 10 days after visiting premises with sick livestock or poultry, or after returning from a foreign country;
  • Wash clothing and footwear using an APHIS-approved disinfectant after contact with sick livestock or poultry;
  • Clean nostrils and fingernails and wash hair thoroughly after contact with sick livestock or poultry;
  • After visiting foreign farms, dispose of clothing, shoes, equipment, cameras, and other items that are difficult or impossible to disinfect;
  • Use shower-in, shower-out facilities, if possible, following visits to foreign countries;
  • Account for the recent movements and health history of all newly introduced animals at their premises of origin through accurate recordkeeping;
  • Account for the recent history of potentially contaminated equipment and animal transport vehicles, including renderers’ trucks, that may be used to haul carcasses away from your premises;
  • Purchase feed only from suppliers who have a quality assurance program for the safe manufacturing, storage, and delivery of their products;
  • Prevent feed and water from coming into contact with animal waste or other potentially contaminated animal products;
  • If you suspect that water has been contaminated, test it and establish its safety before giving it to your animals; 
  • Control all movement of people, vehicles, and equipment on and off  your property to reduce the risk of disease transmission…..this may include measures such as locking unguarded entrances, repairing boundary fences, and enforcing strict biosecurity measures for people, vehicles, and equipment at all times;
  • Do not contaminate your person, clothing, or equipment at foreign fairs, zoos, or other livestock or poultry events;
  • Do not wear items such as jewelry, watches, glasses, or hairpieces when working around animals, since these items cannot be successfully disinfected;
  • Do not bring onto your property any meat or animal products from foreign countries, or equipment that has been used around foreign or sick livestock or poultry; and
  • Do not use feed equipment to handle manure.

Monitor 

  • Increase the number of times per day that your livestock are observed;
  • Report sick animals or unexpected death losses to your veterinarian;
  • Watch for and report any observations of sick or dead birds, fish, or insects;
  • Monitor feed and chemical storage areas for tampering or unauthorized entrance;
  • Watch for unusual packages or containers, especially those found in unlikely or sensitive areas;
  • Verify the source of all incoming animals, feed, supplements, equipment and individuals prior to moving them into the animal area; and
  • Scrutinize the actions of personnel on your farm, the entry of unnecessary personnel, and deviations from normal operations.

Prepare

  • Conduct an operation vulnerability assessment…..look at your operation, determine possible areas of vulnerability, and correct them;
  • Review clinical signs of FAD’s and discuss with all employees; and
  • Review reporting systems and phone numbers in case of a possible FAD or other emergency – these numbers include those of your State Veterinarian, Federal Area Veterinarian in Charge, local law enforcement, and State and Federal 1-800 hotlines.

Severe Condition (Red) High Risk of Terrorist Attack.   Engage in the above activities  and, in addition, the following are recommended:

Communication

  • Frequently check with your veterinarian, extension agent, or livestock organizations for information on possible specific threats and recommended actions.

Physical Security

  • Consider security patrols for your property, if indicated;
  • Do not leave trucks or vehicles loaded with livestock or feed unattended at truck stops;
  • Do not allow visitors or unknown persons onto your property; and
  • Post signs at the entrances to your operation indicating that the operation is under increased surveillance and that no visitors can enter without permission.

Biosecurity

  • Cancel attendance at all fairs, shows, and exhibits;
  • Minimize local and interstate movement of animals and conveyances until the threat passes; and
  • Avoid visiting other farms or areas where animals are gathered.

Monitor

  • Frequently monitor animals, crops, feedstuffs, and chemicals used on your operation; and
  • Contact your veterinarian for a diagnosis on sick or dead animals, even if you normally would not do so.

Prepare

  • Prepare contingency plans in case of attack, quarantines, or stop movement requirements;
  • Ensure at least 1 week’s worth of feed and water is on hand in the event animals are quarantined; and
  • Minimize the addition of animals to your operation

USDA