National Dairy Market At A Glance

 Resize text         Printer-friendly version of this article Printer-friendly version of this article

MD_DA950 
DY, DAIRY
MD DA950 NATIONAL DAIRY MARKET AT A GLANCE

APRIL 13, 2012 MADISON, WI (REPORT 15)

CME GROUP CASH MARKETS (04/13):
BUTTER:  Grade AA closed at $1.4250.  The weekly average for Grade AA is 
$1.4260 (-.0184).
CHEESE:  Barrels closed at $1.4600 and 40# blocks at $1.4875.  The weekly 
average for barrels is $1.4495 (-.0118) and blocks, $1.4875 (-.0019).
       BUTTER HIGHLIGHTS:  The CME Group cash butter price continued to ease 
during the week and closed the trading week at $1.4250.  Churning schedules 
across the country were very active late last week, over the recent holiday 
weekend, and into this week, but now have slowed somewhat.  Class II cream 
demand has declined considerably compared to weeks prior to the holiday.  
Most cream handlers were anticipating the decline, but were also hopeful that 
Class II ice cream needs might absorb a good portion of this cream volume.  
It appears that some ice cream output continues, but not at a pace that would 
readily absorb available cream volumes.  Many ice cream producers are 
indicating that their production lines are often running heavier than is 
usually the case for this time of the season, but recent very favorable 
temperatures and weather patterns have encouraged ice cream and soft service 
consumption.  Butter orders slowed this week as buyers assess their holiday 
carryover volumes before returning to the marketplace.  For those that are 
re-ordering, often their orders are being placed for short term or immediate 
needs.  Food service orders are also lighter this week as buyers assess their 
needs.  Cooperatives Working Together (CWT) assisted butter exports last week 
totaling 3.7 million pounds (1,697 MT).
       CHEESE HIGHLIGHTS:  Increased milk supplies across the country continue 
to push cheese production.  Many plants are operating at or near capacity to 
handle the extra offered supplies.  Some milk is being offered to cheese 
plants at a discount to move the supply.  Cheese inventories are building, 
although export sales have helped to move some excess product.  February 
monthly average prices for barrels and blocks were around 29 cents lower than 
last year's price.  Cheese prices had traded in a narrow band for the 
previous two weeks.  This week saw a 5 1/4 cent drop for barrels on Thursday at 
the CME Group.  Friday's closing trade for the week saw a quick return back 
up the 5 1/4 cents on five sales.  Sales activity at the exchange saw 18 loads 
of barrels traded this week, while blocks reported no sales.  The week's 
close for barrels on Friday was $1.4600 and blocks closed at $1.4875.
       FLUID MILK:  Milk production continues to build in the East and Central 
regions of the nation.  California and the Pacific Northwest saw steady to 
slightly higher milk supplies.  Arizona and Florida are the only states to 
have declining milk production, having recently reached their seasonal peak.  
Fluid milk sales are mostly steady and continue to underperform compared to 
year ago Class I sales.  Processing capacity is being stretched nationwide in 
order to handle the increases in the milk supply. Numerous plants have to 
take on the costly task of shipping milk and components to out of state 
and/or out of region plants with available processing capacity.  Cream 
supplies remain heavy with significant surplus volumes' going to butter 
churns.  There has been a shift away from cream based holiday items towards 
ice cream, but the full ramp up to ice cream production has yet to occur.
       DRY PRODUCTS:  Nonfat dry milk prices are lower on a weak market.  Milk 
processors are operating at near capacity to handle the strong farm milk 
intakes.  The market undertone remains weak.  Dry buttermilk continues to 
trend lower in light to moderate trading.  Dry buttermilk production is 
active as significant volumes of surplus cream are moving to Class IV plants.  
The market undertone is weak.  Prices for dry whole milk are lower as price 
pressure builds on the nonfat and butterfat components of this product.  Dry 
whey prices are unchanged to lower.  The market is still exhibiting weakness 
due to larger inventories finding their way to the spot market.  Heavier than 
usual milk supplies to cheese plants, have increased the whey stream supply.  
Demand from ice cream manufacturers is helping clear some supplies.  Prices 
for whey protein concentrate 34% moved lower on the mostly price series.  
Despite the cooperation between manufacturers and brokers to clear WPC 34% 
according to contract terms, higher than anticipated milk intakes/cheese 
production/WPC 34% production at some locations prompted some manufacturers 
to enter the spot market during the last few weeks.  Lactose prices moved 
higher. The market tone is somewhat mixed as lactose spot load availability 
from manufacturers and resellers is variable.
       INTERNATIONAL DAIRY MARKET OVERVIEW (DMN):  The European 2011 - 2012 
milk quota year has ended and the new year began April 1.  For 2011 - 2012, 
it appears that milk volumes in Austria and Germany surpassed quota levels 
with a few other countries on the border line.  For the most part, milk 
handlers are not reporting milk marketing withholdings prior to the end of 
the recent quota year to maintain under quota levels, thus not a larger 
volume in early April.  Milk production trends in Western Europe remain 
positive throughout most of Europe.  Weather conditions have been favorable 
with mild temperatures and scattered rainfall.  Milk producers are indicating 
that early spring weather patterns are nearly ideal for cow comfort and milk 
production development.  Pastures are greening very well.  Traders and 
handlers of manufactured dairy products are stating that volumes are 
increasing, although overall sales activity remains slow.  Some international 
buyers are returning to the marketplace, but remain cautious with their 
purchases.  For those buyers, hesitancy continues to be exercised with 
purchases mainly for short term or immediate needs, although buyers are 
already looking forward to third quarter needs.  As milk volumes increase, so 
is manufacturing.  Much of current production is clearing to inventory with 
internal or domestic sales clearing typical volumes for this time of the 
season.  Overall, prices for most manufactured dairy products are easing and 
in some instances, starting to align themselves with other international 
offerings.  As milk production expands, manufacturing increases and overall 
sales remain slow and inventories continue to build.  Butter continues to 
clear to PSA and is running about double the level last year at this time.  
The Dairy Management Committee will be meeting next week on the 19th and 
updated PSA figures will be released.  Milk production trends in Eastern 
Europe appear to also be developing on a positive basis.  Although 
temperatures are cool, overall weather patterns are positive for early milk 
production development.  Milk volumes remain seasonally low, but 
manufacturing facilities are starting to gear up to process an increasing 
milk flow.  Stocks of new products are limited, although volumes are starting 
to be generated.  Traders and handlers are indicating that buyer interest 
remains limited, but some buyers at least are starting to shop, especially 
for third quarter needs.  Buyers had been standing back from the marketplace 
for quite some time and now are returning.  Milk production continues to 
trend seasonally lower in New Zealand and Australia, but is finishing the 
season in a very positive fashion.  The additional, unforeseen, milk volumes 
are providing additional late season manufacturing that is providing some 
cushioning to supply/demand balance.  In most instances, this late season 
output is clearing the marketplace with minimal problems.  In New Zealand, 
late summer and early fall weather patterns are quite conducive to milk 
output.  Sufficient moisture, mild temperatures, and sunny days are providing 
for good pasture growth as the season winds down.  Milk output on both the 
North and South Islands is running stronger than the previous year with 
output for the country running very near 10% ahead of last season.  Much of 
this growth is being attributed to the strength at the end of the season.  In 
Australia, weather conditions remain quite favorable for early fall.  The 
heavy rainfall about 6 weeks ago and subsequent flooding in Northern regions 
of Victoria has ended.  Water levels in the affected area did not dissipate 
quickly, but now most of the water is gone, but farmers now have to deal with 
the after effects.  Standing water for much of this time has greatly impacted 
pasture and paddock conditions.  Most of the paddocks will need to be 
reseeded, thus limiting grazing opportunities for the balance of this season.  
Although this Northern Victoria region was negatively impacted by flooding 
and subsequent milk production disruptions, overall milk output in Australia 
continues to register about a 4% increase over last season.  Traders and 
handlers are indicating that sales activity is quiet and most market activity 
is centered around previous commitments.  At the April 3 g/DT event, outside 
of skim and whole milk powder, all product price averages were higher.  At 
this event, two new suppliers offered product on the auction.  Skim milk 
powder was also offered from Europe and lactose was offered from Australia.  
Within the next week or so, the g/DT platform will announce the results of a 
formal rule change proposal pertaining to an adjustment to contract shipping 
periods effective May 1.  Since the event started in 2008, a mix of contracts 
involving one and three month shipment periods were available.  The new 
proposal would make six monthly contracting periods and would run 
consecutively beginning with the month following any given event.  This 
proposed rule change will potentially make it easier for buyers and sellers 
to manage their purchases and commitments. 
       APRIL MILK SUPPLY AND DEMAND ESTIMATES (WAOB):  The milk production 
forecast for 2012 is raised on increased milk cow numbers and gains in milk 
per cow. The skim solids import forecast is raised. The fat-basis export 
forecast is reduced on lower butter exports, but skim solids exports are 
forecast higher on stronger nonfat dry milk (NDM) sales. Ending stock 
forecasts are raised on both a fat and skim-solids basis. With higher 
forecast 2012 milk production and weaker than expected product demand, price 
forecasts for cheese, butter, NDM, and whey are lowered. As a result, both 
Class III and Class IV price forecasts are reduced from last month. The all 
milk price for 2012 is lowered to $17.25- $17.75. 
       
*****SPECIALS THIS ISSUE*****
INTERNATIONAL DAIRY MARKET NEWS (PAGES 8-8B)
DAIRY FUTURES (PAGES 9)
APRIL MILK SUPPLY AND DEMAND ESTIMATES (PAGES 10-11) 
CORRECTED JANUARY FLUID MILK SALES (PAGES 12)
DAIRY GRAPHS (G1-G2)

1200 CDST rick.whipp@ams.usda.gov



Comments (0) Leave a comment 

Name
e-Mail (required)
Location

Comment:

characters left


Mycogen® brand Silage-Specific™ Corn Hybrids

No other company has more experience with silage than Mycogen Seeds. Mycogen® brand TMF corn silage hybrids are bred specifically ... Read More

View all Products in this segment

View All Buyers Guides

)
Feedback Form
Leads to Insight