National Dairy Market At A Glance

 Resize text         Printer-friendly version of this article Printer-friendly version of this article

MD_DA950 
DY, DAIRY
MD DA950 NATIONAL DAIRY MARKET AT A GLANCE

MAY 25, 2012 MADISON, WI (REPORT 21)

CME GROUP CASH MARKETS (05/25):
BUTTER:  Grade AA closed at $1.3875.  The weekly average for Grade AA is 
$1.3860 (+.0345).
CHEESE:  Barrels closed at $1.4700 and 40# blocks at $1.5700.  The weekly 
average for barrels is $1.4660 (+.0100) and blocks, $1.5145 (+.0145).
BUTTER HIGHLIGHTS:  Butter pricing is firming this week for national 
and regional pricing points.  Demand has been fair for the current time of 
year.  Butter feature activity has been light to moderate, but expected to 
increase as more co-featuring is occurring with sweet corn and the unofficial 
start of barbeque season at the Memorial Day holiday weekend.  Lower retail 
butter prices are also helping sales.  Cream demand has increased this week, 
surprising many ahead of a holiday weekend.  Multiples and overages are also 
higher.  Cream supplies are declining due to less standardized cream 
available as school milk needs decline, lower milk output in some areas, and 
declining milkfat levels in milk.  Butter production remains moderate to 
heavy at seasonal levels.  According to the NASS Cold Storage report, stocks 
of butter as of April 30, 2012, total 253.9 million pounds, +79% or 112.1 
million pounds more than April 2011.  Stocks were 22% higher or 45.6 million 
pounds more than March 2012.  Cooperatives Working Together (CWT) has 
accepted requests for export assistance to sell a total of 1.642 million 
pounds (745 metric tons) of butter. The product will be delivered May through 
November 2012.  During 2012, CWT has assisted member cooperatives in making 
export sales of butter and anhydrous milk fat totaling 44.4 million pounds.
CHEESE HIGHLIGHTS:  Cheese production nationally remains heavy.  
Increased milk supplies have been moving to manufacturing facilities with 
cheese plants taking much of the increase.  This has increased stocks in cold 
storage, but manufacturers are reported to be comfortable with current 
inventories.  Export sales are being assisted by the Cooperatives Working 
Together (CWT) program.  American cheese stocks are above year ago and last 
month's levels.  "Other" natural cheese stocks are below year ago levels, but 
increasing from last month.  A recent earthquake in Italy is reported to have 
damaged over 300,000 wheels of aged cheese worth hundreds of millions of 
dollars.  Cheese prices are trading in a fairly narrow range for the month of 
May.  After a lackluster trading week, the block market was bid $.0675 higher 
on Friday with no sellers.  Blocks closed the week at $1.5700 while barrels 
closed at $1.4700 at the CME Group.   
FLUID MILK:  Northeast milk production is widely believed to have 
reached a plateau a "couple" of weeks ago.  Nevertheless, production remains 
heavy and drying at some plants remains at full capacity.  That is now 
projected to be scaled back next week.  Milk production in the Southeast is 
declining overall except in the mid-Atlantic region.  This has kept 
manufacturing capacity in the Southeast at about 60%-70% of capacity but that 
is expected to increase over the weekend.   Midwest farm milk intakes and 
component contents are gradually receding from seasonal highs in the Central 
region.  Various marketing representatives and dairy cooperative managers 
indicate the competition for farm milk is increasing steadily in some areas 
of the Central region where cheese and butter/powder plants are numerous.   
California milk output is mostly steady and remains at or near the seasonal 
peak.  Weather conditions have been warm during the daytime, but are cooler 
at night.  Arizona milk production is trending lower on a week-to-week basis.  
Hotter temperatures are a main cause, along with time in milk and feeding 
changes made because of high feed costs.  Milk production in the Pacific 
Northwest has slowed from the heavy levels a few weeks ago, but remains heavy 
across the region.  Milk handlers are expecting some additional loads to move 
to manufacturing plants during the holiday weekend as some Class I and II 
plants are closed for the long weekend.  Butter/powder and cheese plants in 
Utah and Idaho will be busy over the holiday weekend with local supplies and 
some outside milk from the Northwest.  Favorable weather for milk production 
is helping to keep milk supplies above year ago levels.  
       DRY PRODUCTS:  Nonfat dry milk contract sales prices in the Central 
region moved lower, based on variable indices that declined, but prices from 
some operations that set prices weekly report their prices firmed compared to 
last week.  The market tone is mixed.  All Eastern nonfat dry milk low heat 
prices moved lower, as did the upper end of the high heat price range.  
Prices for Western low/medium nonfat dry milk are mixed this week.  Prices 
continue to move lower off the top ends of the range and mostly series.  
Countering that, the bottom ends of the range and mostly series moved higher 
as those low priced trades were not reported.  Dry buttermilk prices are 
unchanged in the Central and eastern regions.  Western dry buttermilk prices 
continue to trend lower.  The market undertone remains weak.   Prices for dry 
whole milk are unchanged to lower for the week in a lightly tested market.   
In the Central region, dry whey prices are lower and higher on a mixed 
market.  Northeast dry whey prices moved lower at both ends of the price 
range.  Western dry whey prices are lower and export competition moved some 
manufacturers to lower prices to maintain export sales.  Lactose prices are 
both lower and higher on the range, and unchanged on the mostly, with a mixed 
market tone.  Whey protein concentrate 34% prices on both ends of the range 
and the top of the mostly price series shifted lower on a market in search of 
support.  Casein markets are unsettled with prices generally holding steady.
       INTERNATIONAL DAIRY MARKET OVERVIEW (DMN):  Milk production across 
Western European countries is at, near, or slightly off the seasonal peak 
levels.  Indications are that France is past the peak and Germany may have 
peaked this week.  Total milk output continues to trend higher than year ago 
levels across many countries.  Summertime conditions are prevalent across the 
region and processing plants are running at or near capacity levels.  In many 
locales, there is increasing demand for fresh milk and cream based products, 
which is alleviating the stress on plants making cheese, butter, and powders.  
Milk supplies are being handled well and processors are able to make the 
product mix needed for current and future sales.  The results of the recently 
completed export tender are not entirely clear, but industry indications are 
that there are heavy volumes of SMP and WMP being sourced from Europe.  The 
sales are welcomed to move or rebalance stocks that have been built during 
the production season.  Current pricing for SMP and WMP is unchanged, but 
there are indications pricing levels are trying to firm.  The weaker Euro has 
made sourcing European dairy products more attractive. However, the 
international markets have been trending lower for finished dairy products 
and buyers have shown reluctance to be market participants when they perceive 
lower, future values.  Butter movements into PSA remain active.  From March 1 
through May 13, 68,630 MT (151.3 million pounds) of European butter have been 
offered into PSA.  Eastern Europe milk production continues to build towards 
the peak output levels.  Conditions have been generally favorable for milk 
cows and milk output has been higher in certain countries than has been the 
case in others.  Cow numbers are often higher and feed more available, 
leading to milk production gains.  Milk is being processed in a timely 
fashion and manufacturers are building stocks for future sales.   
       Oceania milk producers and handlers are reporting that milk volumes are 
noticeably declining.  The 2011 - 2012 milk production season has been very 
positive in both New Zealand and Australia, especially with a strong finish 
in both countries.  Milk producers are stating that the milking herd needs to 
prepare itself for the upcoming season, thus the end of the current season 
needs to occur.  Milk producers are very pleased with the condition of the 
milking herd going into the winter months.  The herd has not had a stressful 
end to the current season and hopefully the winter months will not be overly 
stressful.  Temperatures are starting to decline, thus fall is in the air.  
Milk production projections for the current year remain positive.  New 
Zealanders continue to project a 9 - 10% increase over the previous season 
while Australians are looking at about a 4% increase.  Milk production in 
Tasmania, which is included with Australian figures, is running about 10% 
stronger than last year, which is helping boost Australian figures.  Milk 
producers and handlers in all countries of the Oceania region are optimistic 
about the upcoming season, but are very aware that opening farm gate prices 
will potentially be lower than the current year.  Farmers have had a positive 
year and are still unsure how lower prices will impact their upcoming season.  
As the milk volume declines, manufacturing facilities that have maintained 
more active processing schedules than anticipated are now being shuttered or 
running on much reduced schedules.  Typically, manufacturing facilities use 
the down time for maintenance, but many will need to compress this down time 
maintenance period into a narrower range this year.  Up to this point, the 
extra milk volume has been able to generate some additional stocks that were 
previously not anticipated.  Much of this additional stock was welcomed and 
provided a supply cushion for late season commitments and also provided for 
enhanced volumes of some products that cleared through the g/DT event.  
Traders and handlers are stating that these end of season volumes are 
declining and stock balance is generally in very good shape for the upcoming 
winter season.  At the May 15 g/DT session #68, rennet casein average prices 
increased 0.7% ($6,244 per MT) when compared to the previous all contract 
average, while all others traded product averages were lower by 0.2% - 11.9%.  
Skim milk powder, sourced from the U.S., again traded in the closest 
contracting period (June) and averaged $2,395 per MT ($1.0864 per pound).  
All other products and supply sources, with the exception of buttermilk 
powder and lactose, saw activity in contract #2 (July).  Anhydrous milk fat 
continues to decline and realized an 11.9% decline ($2,499 per MT) from the 
previous all contract average.  Skim milk ($2,573 per MT) and whole milk 
($2,546 per MT) powder averages were 5.4% and 8.9% lower respectively.  
Lactose did not see activity at this event.      
       APRIL COLD STORAGE (NASS): On April 30, 2012, U.S. cold storage 
holdings of butter totaled 253.8 million pounds, 22% more than a month ago, 
and 79% more than last year.  Natural American cheese holdings total 628.4 
million pounds, 1% more than a month ago, and 1% more than a year ago.  Total 
cheese stocks were 1.0 billion pounds, 2% more than last month but 1% less 
than 2011.   
       APRIL MILK PRODUCTION (NASS):  Milk production in the 23 major States 
during April totaled 16.0 billion pounds, up 3.3% from April 2011.  March 
revised production at 16.4 billion pounds, was up 4.3% from March 2011.  The 
March revision represented a decrease of 5 million pounds or 0.1% from last 
month's preliminary production estimate.   Production per cow in the 23 major 
States averaged 1,875 pounds for April, 40 pounds above April 2011.  The 
number of milk cows on farms in the 23 major States was 8.53 million head, 
94,000 head more than April 2011, and 4,000 head more than March 2012.
       FEDERAL MILK ORDER ADVANCE PRICEHIGHLIGHTS (DAIRY PROGRAMS):   Under the 
Federal milk order pricing system, the base Class I price for June 2012 is 
$15.24 per cwt. This price is derived from the advanced Class III skim milk 
pricing factor of $10.61 and the advanced butterfat pricing factor of 
$1.4279. A Class I differential for each order's principal pricing point 
(county) is added to the base price to determine the Class I price. Compared 
to May 2012, the base Class I price decreased $0.61 per cwt. For selected 
consumer products, the price changes are:  whole milk (3.25% milk fat), -
$0.58 per cwt., -$0.050 per gallon; reduced fat milk (2%), -$0.42 per cwt., -
$0.036 per gallon; fat-free (skim milk), -$0.22 per cwt., -$0.019 per gallon. 
The advanced Class IV skim milk pricing factor is $8.72. Thus, the Class II 
skim milk price for June is $9.42 per cwt., and the Class II nonfat solids 
price is $1.0467. The two-week product price averages for June are: butter 
$1.3506, nonfat dry milk $1.1460, cheese $1.5243, and dry whey $0.5355.






*****SPECIALS THIS ISSUE*****
INTERNATIONAL DAIRY MARKET NEWS (PAGES 8-8B)
DAIRY FUTURES (PAGE 9)
APRIL COLD STORAGE (PAGES 10-11)
APRIL MILK PRODUCTION (PAGE 12)
FEDERAL MILK ORDER JUNE ADVANCE PRICES (PAGE 13)
DAIRY GRAPHS (G1-G2)

1200 CT eric.graf@ams.usda.gov  



Comments (0) Leave a comment 

Name
e-Mail (required)
Location

Comment:

characters left


Ag-Bag MX1012 Commercial Silage Bagger

"The Ag-Bag MX1012 Commercial Silage Bagger is an ideal engine driven mid-size bagger, designed to serve the 150 to 750 ... Read More

View all Products in this segment

View All Buyers Guides

)
Feedback Form
Leads to Insight