National Dairy Market At A Glance

 Resize text         Printer-friendly version of this article Printer-friendly version of this article

MD_DA950 
DY, DAIRY
MD DA950 NATIONAL DAIRY MARKET AT A GLANCE

February 1, 2013 MADISON, WI (REPORT 5)

CME GROUP CASH MARKETS (2/01):
BUTTER:  Grade AA closed at $1.5550.  The weekly average for Grade AA 
is $ 1.5350(+.0300).
CHEESE:  Barrels closed at $ 1.5425 and 40# blocks at $ 1.6450.  The 
weekly average for barrels is $ 1.5415 (-.0448) and blocks, $ 1.6450 
(-.0075).
       BUTTER HIGHLIGHTS:  Butter prices on the CME Grade AA market this 
week moved up 5 cents to close Friday at $1.5550.  Cream remains 
plentiful and available at discounts to butter churns in the West and 
Midwest.  Spot cream loads from the East and the West are moving to a 
few Central Class II plants as well as butter making operations.  
Northeast cream supplies going to churns remain heavy, with most 
churns in the region operating at near capacity.  Manufacturers and 
some buyers are building butter inventories, with increasing stocks 
not being considered problematic.  Prices for bulk butter range from 3 
cents under to 5 cents under the market in the West and from 4-14 
cents over the market in the Northeast.  The CWT program continued to 
assist with export sales for 1.2 million pounds of butter for delivery 
through June 2013.
       CHEESE HIGHLIGHTS:  January has proven to be a tough month for 
cheese prices across the nation.  Milk volumes to cheese plants remain 
strong, especially in the Midwest.  Milk production in the Midwest was 
up 4.8% from last December compared to a national increase of 1.7%.  
Eastern milk supplies are strong with cheese manufacturers working 
busier than anticipated schedules.  Increased inventories of cheese 
are affecting sales as buyers are waiting to find a market bottom to 
increase purchases.  Prices for barrels at the CME Group in January of 
2013 have moved $.1975 lower, with blocks $.1150 lower.  Barrel sales 
have been active for the month with blocks showing less volatility and 
lighter sales.  Lower prices have buyers looking to find cheese for 
aging programs, but slow to make commitments.  Export buyers are in 
much the same position, although sales through the CWT program remain 
active.  This week the program committed to assist with 7.6 million 
pounds of cheese sales.  Trading at the CME Group for barrels closed 
the week at $1.5425, down $.0300 from last Friday.  Blocks closed at 
$1.6450, unchanged from last week's close.   
       FLUID MILK:  The January 11 cow slaughter total of 72.5 million 
head is the highest since 1997.  Contacts continue to report flat milk 
production in California.  Most do not expect much change through the 
winter because of the ongoing financial stress at the producer level.  
The milk flow in New Mexico is generally steady with the eastern part 
of the state experiencing more stress from feed prices than the west.  
It is also indicated that fat and protein levels are very good and 
have been that way all fall and winter.  Milk receipts in the Pacific 
Northwest are at expected levels.  Weather conditions are reported to 
be favorable in Utah and Idaho for milk production.  Manufacturing 
capacity in the region is adequate to handle current supplies of milk.   
Central farm milk intakes continue to outpace expectations in the 
Central region.  In some places, milk intakes have outstripped 
capacity at local processing facilities.  A few spot milk loads 
cleared into Class III operations at $1.50 - $3.00 under Class, but 
interest is very light.  Market participants note flat to slightly 
lower interest in bottled milk at the beginning of this week.  Class I 
demand has increased in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast regions as a 
number of storm fronts have prompted increased fluid sales.  
Manufacturing milk supplies have marginally declined as a result of 
the increase in fluid milk demand.   Milk production in the Southeast 
region has improved with most of the increases being noted in Georgia 
and the Gulf Coast states.  
       DRY PRODUCTS:  Price trends for Central and East nonfat dry milk 
were mixed this week in an unsettled market.  Prices for low heat 
nonfat dry milk moved higher on the full range, but held steady on the 
mostly range.  The high heat price range expanded as the low end of 
the range moved lower and the high end of the range moved higher.  
Central market participants report the price differentials that 
usually delineate regional manufacturers' spot nonfat dry milk prices 
have largely disappeared. Production of nonfat dry milk in the East 
declined in some areas, but overall production continues to add to 
supplies.  Western low/medium heat NDM prices are mixed this week with 
the average of the price range increasing while the average of the 
mostly price declined.  Powder production remains heavy and stocks are 
heavier than desired at production plants and building.  A weaker tone 
continues to chip away at the top of the Central and East dry 
buttermilk market.  With cream supplies flowing into the Central 
region from the East and West, and a few ice cream plants on temporary 
hiatus, churns in the region are filled.  Western buttermilk powder 
range prices narrowed with the bottom increasing and the top 
declining.  The average of the mostly price series declined.  Sales 
activity remains light and production is heavier than anticipated.  
Dry whole milk prices stepped lower this week as buyers factor in 
recent adjustments in nonfat and butterfat solids market values and 
inventories.  Northeast dry whey prices moved marginally lower this 
week as sales based on various price indices decreased the upper end 
of the range.  Most dry whey inventories are expanding.  Conditions in 
the Central dry whey market remain lethargic, and prices are unchanged 
to slightly lower on the top of the range and bottom of the mostly.  
Western dry whey prices are mostly steady to lower.  The average 
prices for both the range and mostly series are lower this week.  No 
changes are noted on the whey protein concentrate 34% mostly price 
series this week.  Spot load availability from some manufacturers is 
steady, with pricing ranging from market minus to market plus 
depending on inventories and WPC 34% quality characteristics.  Another 
decrease in pricing on the lactose range series registered this week, 
with F.O.B. sales clearing at $.047.  This price level last appeared 
at the bottom of the Central and West range series in September of 
2011.  Prices are unchanged for both casein types.  The market tone is 
steady to firm.
       INTERNATIONAL DAIRY MARKET NEWS (DMN):  WESTERN EUROPE OVERVIEW:  
Milk production trends in Western Europe are steady with recent weeks 
with limited events occurring that are affecting output to any great 
extent.  Aggregate seasonal output for the EU countries is below year 
ago levels.  Weather conditions in Germany have been variable, but 
only limited effects on milk production and collections.  Output is 
generally stable to slightly lower.  Ireland and England remain behind 
year ago levels.  Cost of production factors continue to be a limiting 
influence for milk growth.  Milk prices have trended higher.  Euro 
valuation increases are increasing pricing in the world market and 
limiting sales.  World buyers are finding pricing of EU sourced dairy 
products more expensive and more challenging to work into budgets.  
While butter and WMP prices remain at a competitive disadvantage to 
export, SMP and whey are still moving.  Current returns are favorable 
for cheese/whey derivatives production.  Cheese demand is good.  
EASTERN EUROPE OVERVIEW: Milk growth has slowed in Poland, but remains 
above year ago marks.  Dairy product output is steady to lower across 
countries.  Traders and handlers are looking for value offerings and 
reaching to areas with product availability.  OCEANIA OVERVIEW:  NEW 
ZEALAND milk production for the month of December was about 8% higher 
than a year earlier, with the season to date trend at 7% higher.  The 
fantastic run of weather for NZ continues and output continues in line 
with forecasts.  The expectations are for contraction at the end of 
shoulder season months and for the total season projections to be 
around 3-4% higher than the previous season.  Processing plants are 
running on planned schedules and making products for orders on the 
books.  AUSTRALIAN milk output in December was tracking 2% lower, a 
level surprising to the industry.  Additional adjustments are expected 
to pull the seasonal growth rate closer to 1% above the prior season.  
Recent weather conditions have been hot in some areas, yet rainy with 
floods in others.  The direct impact on the milking herd has been 
seemingly minimal to the current point, yet the overall effects are 
responsible for the decline in the milk flow.  Some flooding in 
Queensland has disrupted milk collections into the processing plants.  
Dairy product prices in the region are mostly steady with some slight 
adjustments occurring.  Supplies are generally in good balance to 
service current ordering and sales on the books.  Butter orders are 
moving well.  Skim milk powder pricing is slightly lower.  Competitive 
pricing from other world suppliers is noted.  Whole milk powder market 
trends are slightly firmer with demand in play from Asia.  Cheese 
market pricing and trends are steady.
       DECEMBER AGRICULTURAL PRICES (NASS):  The All Milk price received 
by farmers was $20.00 in January, down $0.90 from December 2012 and up 
$1.00 from January 2012.  The Milk Cows price was $1,370 in January, 
down $90 from January 2012.  Alfalfa hay price was $217.00 in January, 
up $24.00 from January 2012.  Corn price was $6.98 in January, up 
$0.91 from January 2012. Soybean price was $14.10 in January, up $2.20 
from January 2012. The milk-feed price ratio was 1.58 in January, down 
0.14 from January 2012.  The index of prices received by farmers for 
dairy products decreased 7 points during the month of January 2013 to 
153. Compared with January 2012, the index was up 8 points (5.5 
percent). The index of prices paid by farmers for commodities and 
services, interest, taxes, and wage rates in January 2013 increased 3 
points to 221. Compared with January 2012, the index was up 11 points 
(5.2 percent).  
       CONSUMER PRICE INDEX (BLS):  The December CPI for all food is 
235.4, up 1.8% from December 2011.  The dairy products index is 219.4, 
up 0.5% from a year ago.  The following are December-to-December 
changes for selected products: fresh whole milk is +2.9%; cheese, 
+0.1%; and butter, -2.6%.
       COMMERCIAL DISAPPEARANCE (ERS, AMS):  Commercial disappearance of 
dairy products during the first eleven months of 2012 totals 185.8 
billion pounds, 2.1% above the same period of 2011.  Comparing 
disappearance levels with year earlier levels: butter is even; 
American cheese, +2.2%; Other cheese, +1.9%; Nonfat Dry Milk, +21.6%; 
Fluid Milk Products, -1.7%.
       JANUARY FMMO CLASS AND COMPONENT PRICES (DAIRY PROGRAMS):    The 
following are the January 2013 prices under the Federal Milk Order 
pricing system and the changes from the previous month:  Class II 
$18.19 (-$0.11), Class III $18.14 (-$0.52), and Class IV $17.63(-
$0.20).  Product price averages used in computing Class prices are:  
butter $1.5066, NDM $1.5601, cheese $1.7485, and dry whey $0.6503.  
The Class II butterfat price is $1.6238 and the Class III/IV butterfat 
price is $1.6168.  Further information may be found at: 
www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/PriceFormulas2012
       FEBRUARY ANNOUNCED COOPERATIVE CLASS I PRICES (FMMO):  For 
February 2013, the all-city average announced cooperative Class I 
price was $23.28, $2.43 higher than the Federal milk order (FMO) Class 
I price average for these cities.  The February 2013 Cooperative Class 
I price was $0.79 lower than the January 2013 price.  The February 
2013 Federal order Class I price was $0.76 lower than the January 2013 
price.  On an individual city basis, the difference between the 
Federal order and announced cooperative Class I price ranged from 
$0.52 in Phoenix, AZ, to $4.21 in Miami, FL. For February 2012, the 
all-city average announced cooperative Class I price was $22.12, $2.47 
higher than the Federal order Class I price average for these cities.  
Note: For most cities, the Announced Cooperative Class I Price now 
includes premiums paid for milk produced without rBST.
       NOVEMBER OVER-ORDER CHARGES ON PRODUCER MILK (FMMO):  For 
November 2012, the all reporting areas combined average over-order 
charge on producer milk used in Class I was $2.12, the same as the 
October 2012 average. Ninety percent of the producer milk used in 
Class I carried an over-order charge. On an individual order basis, 
Class I over-order charges ranged from $0.81 in the Pacific Northwest 
to $3.01 in the Florida Order. For producer milk used in Class II, the 
all reporting areas combined average over-order charge was $1.20, down 
$0.08 from the October 2012 average.  Eighty percent of the producer 
milk used in Class II carried an over-order charge.


SPECIALS THIS ISSUE
INTERNATIONAL DAIRY MARKET NEWS (PAGES 8 - 8B)
DAIRY FUTURES (PAGE 9)
JANUARY MONTHLY AVERAGES AND SUMMARY (PAGES 10-12)
CONSUMER PRICE INDEX & COMMERCIL DISAPPEARANCE (PAGE 13)
JANUARY FMMO CLASS AND COMPONENT PRICES (PAGE 14)
JANUARY AGRICULTURAL PRICES (PAGE 15)
NOVEMBER OVER-ORDER CHARGES ON PRODUCER MILK (PAGE 16)
FEBRUARY ANNOUNCED COOPERATIVE CLASS I PRICES (PAGE 17)
GRAPHS (PAGES G1 - G2)

1200CT eric.graf@ams.usda.gov 



Comments (0) Leave a comment 

Name
e-Mail (required)
Location

Comment:

characters left


AG10 Series Silage Defacers

Loosen silage while maintaining a smooth, compacted bunker space resulting in better feed and less waste. This unique tool pierces, ... Read More

View all Products in this segment

View All Buyers Guides

Feedback Form
Leads to Insight