National Dairy Market At A Glance

 Resize text         Printer-friendly version of this article Printer-friendly version of this article

MD_DA950 
DY, DAIRY
MD DA950 NATIONAL DAIRY MARKET AT A GLANCE

February 15, 2013 MADISON, WI (REPORT 7)

CME GROUP CASH MARKETS (2/15):
BUTTER:  Grade AA closed at $1.6050.  The weekly average for 
Grade AA is $1.5810 (+.0260).
CHEESE:  Barrels closed at $1.6300 and 40# blocks at $1.6750.  
The weekly average for barrels is $1.6080 (+.0600) and blocks, 
$1.6670 (+.0200).
      BUTTER HIGHLIGHTS:   Butter production is strong across all 
regions.  Ample cream is reported in the West and Central 
regions, with increased cream available in the Northeast 
following winter storm Nemo.  Most manufacturers in all regions 
are building inventories.  Bulk butter in the Northeast is 
selling 4 to 14 cents over market and up to 7 cents over market 
in the Central region.  Western bulk butter is often also 
selling for a premium price.  Wednesday CME AA butter closed up 
for the first price movement in two weeks.  Exports of butter 
and milkfat for January - December 2012 total 107.2 million 
pounds, down 24% from the previous year.  The butter and milkfat 
exports account for 5.8% of butter production in the U.S. for 
the year.  According to the FAS, quota imports of butter for 
January 2013 total 0.8 million pounds, 47.2% more than the same 
period in 2012.  January imports for 2013 account for 5.3% of 
the yearly total quota.  Imports of High-Tier butter (above 
quota and with a penalty) are 87,640 pounds, significantly 
higher than last year's high tier import of 9,932 pounds for 
January.  Cooperatives Working Together (CWT) has accepted 
requests for export assistance to sell 524,700 pounds (238 
metric tons) of butter. The product will be delivered February 
through July 2013.  
      CHEESE HIGHLIGHTS:  Cheese prices continued to show 
strength this week.  Last week's higher weekly average price was 
reinforced this week with continued price strength.  Barrel 
prices showed the strongest recovery as the spread between 
barrels and blocks returned to a more typical margin.  Some 
increased sales activity was noted as more buyers returned to 
the market to replenish supplies.  Some increased milk supplies 
are available for manufacturing and cheese plants are taking 
some of that volume.  Cheese inventories at manufacturers are 
described as manageable with export sales helping to balance 
sales.  The CWT program announced assistance for export sales of 
2.3 million pounds this week.  Export sales volumes for 2012 
from FAS were reported to total 573.3 million pounds, up 16% 
from the previous year, a new record volume.  Exports accounted 
for 5.3% of total US cheese production for the year.  At the CME 
Group on Friday, barrels closed at $1.6300 up $.0700 from last 
weeks close.  Blocks closed at $1.6750 up $.0250 from last 
Friday's close.      
      FLUID MILK:   Weather conditions for milk production in 
CALIFORNIA have been near ideal for a number of weeks.  There 
are now numerous reports of output pulling ahead of year ago 
numbers for the first time in many months.  Milk output in 
ARIZONA is being called steady.  There was some moisture again 
over the weekend and temperatures are running about 6-13 degrees 
below normal for this season.  Not bad conditions, but not all 
that conducive to much growth either.  New Mexico milk 
production is flat.  Conditions are a bit cooler again and this 
is not helping with milk flow.  Cream markets remain on the weak 
side, but this week it is due more to some plant production 
problems in California versus having to move it out of state 
because of no interest.  Milk production in the Pacific 
Northwest remains on a mostly steady keel.  Milk volumes are 
following expected amounts with no handling problems reported in 
the region.  Utah and Idaho temperatures moderated this week and 
there is a small increase in production as cows responded to 
more favorable weather conditions.  Local manufacturers are able 
to process current supplies of milk and are seeing some 
increased supplies of milk from outside the region.  Throughout 
the Central region, weather has been conducive to cow comfort 
this winter.  Drought conditions are easing somewhat due to 
snowfall and rain received in the last two weeks.  Some plant 
operators indicate their intake volumes started a slow decline 
during the last 1 - 2 weeks.  Other processors note their 
intakes continue growing on a weekly basis.  Milk haulers are 
reporting more milk per load is arriving at processing plants 
than in January.  Cream supplies remain heavy in the East, due 
to volumes from Class I plants and yogurt manufacturers.  A 
major winter storm hit the Northeast region, resulting in many 
trucks being unable to make it to farms, which caused some milk 
to be dumped.   Manufacturing milk supplies marginally increased 
in the Mid-Atlantic region as milk was diverted from New England 
and the Northeast.  Milk production in Florida continues to 
increase, but remains below year ago levels.   Milk supplies are 
nearly in balance with demand in the Southeast region with only 
a few loads being shipped to auxiliary manufacturing facilities.  
Milk production continues to show marginal increases on a week 
to week basis.  In all regions there are also more indications 
that ice cream plants are gearing up for the spring/summer 
season and buying more cream.  
      DRY PRODUCTS:  Nonfat dry milk prices in the Central and 
Eastern regions decreased on the range, and are unchanged to 
lower on the mostly price series.  Average prices for both the 
range and mostly series moved lower for Western low/medium heat 
powder.   Buyers see no reason to make additional spot purchases 
while price averages continue to decline.  Sellers noted that 
prices are quoted at the same level for both the Central and 
Western regions, not a normal occurrence.  Central and Eastern 
dry buttermilk prices continued on their downward trend and 
declined for the fifth consecutive week with spot sales lowering 
the low end of the range and sales based on various price 
indices lowering the upper end of the range.   Domestic spot 
load interest is light.   Trading was very light for Western 
buttermilk powder, where range prices were steady while the 
mostly series average was lower.  Light spot trading is keeping 
dry whole milk prices unchanged to slightly lower on the top of 
the range for the week.  The overall tone of dry whey markets is 
lower.  Central and Western average of the mostly dry whey 
prices declined, as did the West and Northwest range.  Dry whey 
production is active in the Northeast and Central regions, and 
steady in the West.  Central and West whey protein concentrate 
34% prices are unchanged on the range, and fractionally lower on 
the bottom of the mostly series this week.   The dual nature of 
the lactose market continues this week.  Both the range and 
mostly series are unchanged. Prices on spot loads of unground 
lactose are trending toward the low end the range.  Higher mesh 
size spot loads are reportedly maintaining their market plus 
values and are less readily available.   Pricing for both casein 
types is unchanged.  The market undertone remains on the firm 
side.  
      INTERNATIONAL DAIRY MARKET NEWS (DMN):  WESTERN EUROPE 
OVERVIEW:  Milk production across Western Europe is tending to 
follow recent patterns with limited weather or related stress 
across the region.  Relatively high feed costs remain a concern 
for dairy producers attempting to grow output through 
supplemental feeding.  Milk is showing incremental, seasonal 
growth.  Total, overall volumes are projected to be below year 
ago levels in January and the trends are also reported to 
continue into February.  German output is trending slightly 
higher than a year ago.  Processors are finding adequate milk 
supplies to make products of first choice, but some milk 
declines resulting from early season conditions are now not 
allowing all product spectrums to be manufactured.  An example 
would be casein output being below expected volumes in several 
countries.  Overall, milk prices have been fairly stable.  The 
Euro weakened during the past weeks, but has begun to strengthen 
against other currencies.  The effects are having some impacts 
on restricting exports.  High prices in relation to other 
exporting countries are also affecting the ability of the trade 
to move dairy products into international channels.  There 
remains a good pull for internal demand of fresh and internal 
dairy products.  Butter pricing is steady to slightly lower.  
The PSA butter program year goes through the end of February and 
the butter in storage will need to be out by then.  The butter 
offerings have been readily absorbed into the market.  Whole 
milk powder pricing remains high in relation to world markets 
and exports are minimal.  The skim milk market pricing is more 
in line with competition and garnering internal and external 
interest.  The dry whey market prices are tending lower, 
reflecting slower demand and competitive pricing in other 
exporting countries.  EASTERN EUROPE OVERVIEW: Milk production 
trends in Eastern Europe are steady to slightly lower.  Milk 
output in Poland is being tempered with considerations being 
given to quota issues.  The late in the year declines are 
pulling down the yearly and seasonal output forecast.  Dairy 
product offerings are tending to be along expected volumes with 
pricing levels holding mostly steady.  OCEANIA OVERVIEW: NEW 
ZEALAND milk output trends continue to show milk volumes 
dropping and current trends pulling season to date total volumes 
lower.  Milk is beginning to move below year ago marks.   
Expectations are that this will continue throughout the 
remainder of the season.  Recent dry conditions in the North 
Island milk producing areas are impacting the milk flow there 
with some farmers drying off cows early.  The full impact of the 
detection of DCD in NZ dairy products is still being assessed, 
but there have been few concerns beyond the initial story.  
AUSTRALIAN milk production is trending lower with the latest 
stats for December being down 1.3% versus a year earlier.  The 
current milk flows are noted to be running at below year ago 
levels at this time with the total seasonal growth rate versus a 
year ago shrinking.  The weather conditions of rains and 
flooding in the Northern Queensland region are severely 
impacting the dairy industry in that area, which is mainly 
servicing the fluid milk needs for the locale.  Cattle, 
infrastructure and collection have all been affected.  Overall, 
the effects on the total milk market are limited, yet impactful 
for those in the areas.  Elsewhere, hotter and dryer weather 
conditions in the major milk producing regions of Victoria and 
New South Wales are impacting milk yields and output to a 
limited extent.  Dairy product pricing trends are steady to 
slightly firm.  With declining milk supplies at or below 
seasonal trends, processing schedules are being aligned to make 
products of greatest needs.  g/Dt:  At the February 5th g/DT 
session #85, average prices for most products traded and 
contracting periods were mostly steady to firm.  Average prices 
across all contracting periods and individual products ranged 
from 0.1% lower to 7.2% higher.  The product price averages (per 
MT) and percent changes from the previous average are:  
anhydrous milk fat, $3,500, +7.2%; buttermilk powder, $3,530, 
+3.7%; cheddar cheese, $3,525, -0.1%; lactose, $1,800, n.a.; 
milk protein concentrate, $6,070, +1.2%; rennet casein, $8,766, 
+3.3%; skim milk powder, $3,554, +0.5%; and whole milk powder, 
$3,468, +5.4%.  The next event, #86, will be on February 19.  
Butter will trade for the first time.  
      FEBRUARY MILK SUPPLY AND DEMAND ESTIMATES (WAOB):  The milk 
production forecast for 2013 is raised.  Milk cow numbers are 
raised because USDA's Cattle report indicated that the number of 
cows on January 1 was about unchanged from 2012.  Milk per cow 
forecasts are raised because last quarter-2012 estimates were 
higher than expected and lower forecast feed costs support 
higher milk yields in 2013.  Fat-basis trade estimates for 2013 
are unchanged.  The skim-solids export estimate for 2013 is 
raised largely on expectations of stronger nonfat dry milk (NDM) 
shipments, but the import forecast is unchanged.  Milk 
production estimates for 2012 are raised, reflecting end-of-year 
production data.  Dairy trade estimates for 2012 reflect the 
pace of trade through November.  Cheese prices are unchanged 
from last month, but the price range is narrowed.  NDM and whey 
prices are raised reflecting stronger demand, but the butter 
price is lowered.  Despite a higher whey price, the forecast 
Class III price is unchanged although the range is tightened. 
Lower butter prices are more than offset by higher NDM prices 
resulting in a slightly higher forecast Class IV price.  The 
range of all milk price for 2013 is narrowed to $18.90 to 
$19.70.
      FEDERAL MILK ORDER MARKETING AND UTILIZATION 2012 ANNUAL 
SUMMARY (DAIRY PROGRAMS):  During 2012, more than 122.3 billion 
pounds of milk were received from producers.  This total annual 
volume of milk is 3.8% lower than the 2011 total annual volume.  
There were volumes of milk not pooled due to intraorder 
disadvantageous price relationships in both years.  More than 
43.4 billion pounds of producer milk were used in Class I 
products, 2.3% lower than the previous year.  The all-market 
average Class utilization percentages were: Class I = 35%, Class 
II = 14%, Class III = 39% and Class IV = 12%.  The 2012 weighted 
average statistical uniform price was $18.05, $1.82 lower than 
the 2011 weighted average statistical uniform price.
      NOVEMBER MAILBOX MILK PRICES FOR SELECTED REPORTING AREAS 
IN FEDERAL MILK ORDERS AND CALIFORNIA (AMS & CDFA):  In November 
2012, mailbox milk prices for selected reporting areas in 
Federal milk orders averaged $22.19, up $0.64 from the October 
2012 average, and up $1.60 from the November 2011 average.  The 
component tests of producer milk in November 2012 were: 
butterfat, 3.85%; protein, 3.19%; and other solids, 5.72%.  On 
an individual reporting area basis, mailbox prices increased in 
all Federal milk order reporting areas except Minnesota when 
compared to the previous month. Mailbox prices in November 2012 
ranged from $24.04 in Florida to $20.36 in New Mexico.

       
SPECIALS THIS ISSUE
INTERNATIONAL DAIRY MARKET NEWS (PAGES 8 - 8B)
DAIRY FUTURES (PAGE 9)
JANUARY MILK SUPPLY AND DEMAND ESTIMATES (PAGES 10 - 11)
2012 FEDERAL MILK ORDER MARKETING SUMMARY (PAGE 12)
NOVEMBER MAILBOX MILK PRICES (PAGE 13)
GRAPHS (PAGES G1 - G2)



1200CT eric.graf@ams.usda.gov 


Related Articles

Sponsored Links


Comments (0) Leave a comment 

Name
e-Mail (required)
Location

Comment:

characters left


BiG Pack 1290 HDP II

Krone North America presents the latest innovation in large square balers, the BiG Pack 1290 HDP II. This generation ... Read More

View all Products in this segment

View All Buyers Guides

Feedback Form
Leads to Insight