National Dairy Market At A Glance

 Resize text         Printer-friendly version of this article Printer-friendly version of this article

MD_DA950 
DY, DAIRY
MD DA950 NATIONAL DAIRY MARKET AT A GLANCE

August 2, 2013 MADISON, WI (REPORT 31)

CME GROUP CASH MARKETS (8/2):
BUTTER:  Grade AA closed at $1.4400.  The weekly average for 
Grade AA is $1.4320 (-.0065).  
CHEESE:  Barrels closed at $1.7725 and 40# blocks at $1.7750.  
The weekly average for barrels is $1.7625 (+.0340) and blocks, 
$1.7705 (+.0160).
     BUTTER HIGHLIGHTS:  In the West, production of butter is 
mixed as churns are taking advantage of steady to higher cream 
multiples to move cream away from the churn at profitable 
levels.  Good ice cream and Class II demand continues.  Some 
Western churns are turning from bulk butter production to more 
print butter for fall promotions.  Cream in the Northeast has 
become increasingly tight, due to declines in milk production 
and lower butterfat levels.  Those declines have substantially 
reduced Northeast butter production.  Domestic demand for 
Northeast butter can be best described as average, while export 
interest remains good.  The butter inventory is at the forefront 
of many Central Region butter manufacturers' focus.  Butter 
prices remaining at a lower level may help sales of butter 
churned in the Central Region but retailers can buy only so much 
and many are already well stocked.  Thus, especially with the 
magnitude of butter inventories, there are no general 
expectations among Central butter manufacturers that domestic 
sales alone in the near future can significantly absorb 
sufficient butter to remove the bearish feeling about markets.  
Improved exports are often cited as a factor that could help.  
Prices for bulk butter in the West range from 3 cents under to 6 
cents under the market and in the Northeast, 4 to 6 cents over 
the market. NASS reports that June 2013 butter production was 
141 million pounds, 2.7% above June 2012, but 13.8% below May 
2013.
CHEESE HIGHLIGHTS:  Cheese prices continue strong as spot 
prices at the CME Group have been higher for the last three 
weeks.  The market is unsettled as the trade decides if lower 
milk volumes will continue or if the large inventories in cold 
storage are the more important factors.  Milk supplies have 
rebounded slightly from the heat induced reductions.  Cheese 
plants are taking differing positions on increasing production 
depending on their individual analysis.  Domestic demand remains 
good with some buyers looking to place orders for late third 
quarter and fourth quarter purchases.  Export demand is being 
aided by assistance from the CWT program again this week.  
Trading activity at the CME Group was quiet as barrel prices 
held steady until it gained 1.25 cents on Friday, closing at 
$1.7725.  Blocks edged higher on sales of six loads for the week 
and closed at $1.7750.
FLUID MILK:  Cooler temperatures across most of the country have 
helped moderate the downward trend in milk production.  Any 
bounce backs in production have been marginal at best.  Milk 
components remain at reduced levels and are affecting yields at 
processing plants.  School start-ups across the southern portion 
of the nation are expected to limit manufacturing milk supplies 
in some areas as early as next week.  Cream markets continue to 
firm as supplies are less available, due to lower milk 
production and butterfat levels.  Cream multiples have 
increased, but the lower butter prices have taken some of the 
sting out of butterfat pricing.  
      DRY PRODUCTS:  Nonfat dry milk prices were mixed with a 
firm undertone across the nation.  Production is lower across 
the nation due to declining seasonal milk production.  Domestic 
demand is fair, but export sales remain strong.  Limited 
production schedules have given the market a firm undertone.  
Dry buttermilk prices continue to move higher on a firming 
market as production is declining seasonally.  Supplies are 
tight.  Dry whey prices were mixed in an unsettled market. 
Production has declined in some areas.  Supplies range from 
adequate to heavy.  Export demand is active, while domestic 
buyers are filling immediate needs and, in some areas, hesitant 
to expand inventories.  WPC 34% prices are steady to firm as 
supplies are described as tight by some manufacturers.  Declines 
in cheese production have also lowered WPC 34% production.  
Lactose prices are steady with a firm undertone.  
      INTERNATIONAL DAIRY MARKET NEWS (DMN):  WESTERN AND EASTERN 
EUROPE:  WESTERN OVERVIEW:  Milk production is declining 
seasonally across most countries.  Production in Germany and 
Ireland is trending lower on a week-to-week basis.  Indications 
are that current receipts are higher than year ago levels.  The 
reversal of the impact of poor conditions is welcomed as 
processors have milk to manufacture.  There were early concerns 
about not being able to make and market full product lines.  
Milk production in France has stayed higher and at levels just 
short of a year ago.  Across Europe, higher farm milk prices and 
more reasonable feed cost have been welcomed.  Milk production 
responses to the conditions has been favorable, with the 
extension of milk volumes over the shoulder past the peak likely 
has been the result.  The dairy product markets are mostly 
steady to slightly higher compared to recent weeks.  The 
marketing sector is quiet and has slowed down with widespread 
vacations and holidays occurring across Europe.  High finished 
product prices and the stronger Euro are making exporting of 
dairy products more challenging.  Butter movements into the PSA 
program continue at a slower pace than a year ago, currently 
topping 81,400 MT for the current program period, down from 
122,600 MT a year ago.  Offerings into the PSA can be made 
through August 15.  EASTERN OVERVIEW: Milk output declines are 
noted across most countries in Eastern Europe, reflecting 
weather conditions and the time in milk for cows.  Processors 
are making products of greatest need.  Products are available to 
fill contracted needs; more limited for short term sales.  
OCEANIA OVERVIEW:  AUSTRALIAN milk production trends are 
bottoming out at the low point of the cycle.  Winter conditions 
are overall mild.  Higher milk prices are a positive sign for 
dairy producers.  Feed supplies are currently hard to find and 
are pricy.  Alternative feeds are being utilized until new crops 
and pastures are available.  The decline in the AU dollar versus 
the US dollar is a positive for the agricultural sector.  Recent 
milk prices are being stepped up because of the return 
projections and to be competitive with other processors.  
According to Dairy Australia, June milk production in Australia 
ran 6.8% lower than June 2012.  Milk output for the July 2012 - 
June 2013 production year totaled 9.2 million litres, 3.0% lower 
(unadjusted) than the previous production year.  For the 2012/13 
year, unadjusted regional changes are:  New South Wales, -1.4%; 
Victoria, -2.8%; Queensland -5.6%; South Australia -6.0%; 
Western Australia -0.3%; and Tasmania -3.6%.  In 2012/13, the 
regional shares of total production are:  Victoria, 65.6%; New 
South Wales, 11.5%; Tasmania, 8.3%; South Australia, 5.8%; 
Queensland, 5.0%; and Western Australia, 3.7%.  NEW ZEALAND milk 
output is seasonally light.  Pastures and cropping conditions 
are in good shape.  Cows are reported to be in fair to good 
stature entering the new production season with the milk 
beginning to build in August.  Milk prices are favorable for 
milk producers as they plan and finance ahead.  Milk growth is 
being forecast from flat to slightly higher for the new 
production year, yet the comparisons versus the same months may 
be skewed.  The previous season got off to a great start with 
hefty gains recorded in early months.  Later, the season ended 
in drought conditions and often early.  Dairy product prices are 
mainly steady yet untested in limited, seasonal trading.  
Offering volumes are light for commodity items as processors 
make value added products and products to fill needs in the 
current, tight milk period.  Dairy plants are being readied for 
the upcoming season.  
      JULY CLASS AND COMPONENT PRICES (DAIRY PROGRAMS):
The following are the July 2013 prices under the Federal Milk 
Order pricing system and the changes from the previous month: 
Class II $19.22 (+0.08), Class III $17.38 (-0.64), and Class IV 
$18.90 (+$0.02). Product price averages used in computing Class 
prices are: butter $1.4674, NDM $1.7272, cheese $1.7142, and dry 
whey $0.5804. The Class II butterfat price is $1.5763 and the 
Class III/IV butterfat price is $1.5693. Further information may 
be found at: www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/PriceFormulas2013
      JUNE CONSUMER PRICE INDEX (BLS):  The June 2013 CPI for all 
food is 236.8, up 1.4% from June 2012. The dairy products index 
is 216.1, up 0.3% from a year ago. The following are the June to 
June changes for selected products: fresh whole milk is +3.3%; 
cheese, -0.5%; and butter, +4.7%.
      JULY AGRICULTURE PRICES HIGHLIGHTS (NASS):  The All Milk 
price received by farmers was $19.10 in July, down $0.40 from 
June 2013, but up $2.20 from July 2012. Alfalfa hay price was 
$209.00 in July, up $11.00 from July 2012. Corn price was $6.83 
in July, down $0.31 from July 2012. Soybean price was $15.40 in 
July, unchanged from July 2012. The milk-feed price ratio was 
1.52 in July, up 0.18 from July 2012.  The index of prices 
received by farmers for dairy products during the month of July 
2013 was down 3 points to 146. Compared with July 2012, the 
index was up 17 points (13.2%). The index of prices paid by 
farmers for commodities and services, interest, taxes, and wage 
rates in July 2013 was up 1 point to 220. Compared with July 
2012, the index was up 7 points (3.3%).    
      JUNE 2013 DAIRY PRODUCTS (NASS):  BUTTER production was 
140.8 million pounds, 2.7% above June 2012, but 13.8% below May 
2013. AMERICAN TYPE CHEESE production totaled 364.3 million 
pounds, 1.2% above June 2012, but 6.2% below May 2013. TOTAL 
CHEESE output (excluding cottage cheese) was 913.8 million 
pounds, 1.4% above June 2012, but 3.9% below May 2013. NONFAT 
DRY MILK production, for human food, totaled 130.5 million 
pounds, 22.5% below June 2012 and 13.3% below May 2013. DRY WHEY 
production, for human food, was 75.2 million pounds, 5.1% below 
June 2012 and 0.4% below May 2013. ICE CREAM (hard) production 
totaled 80.1 million gallons, 1.2% below June 2012 but 3.1% 
above May 2013.

*****SPECIALS THIS ISSUE*****
INTERNATIONAL DAIRY MARKET NEWS (PAGES 8-8A)
DAIRY FUTURES (PAGE 9)
JULY MONTHLY AVERAGES AND SUMMARY (PAGES 10-12)
JULY FMMO CLASS PRICES (PAGE 13)
JUNE CONSUMER PRICE INDEX (PAGE14)
JULY AGRICULTURE PRICES (PAGE 15)
JUNE DAIRY PRODUCTS (PAGE 16)
DAIRY GRAPHS (G1-G2)

1200CT rick.whipp@ams.usda.gov








Comments (0) Leave a comment 

Name
e-Mail (required)
Location

Comment:

characters left


6D Series

John Deere offers four models in its economical 6D Series Tractor lineup: the 105 horsepower 6105D, 115 horsepower 6115D; 130 ... Read More

View all Products in this segment

View All Buyers Guides

)
Feedback Form
Leads to Insight