National Dairy Market At A Glance

MD_DA950                                                                       

DY, DAIRY                                                                             

MD DA950 NATIONAL DAIRY MARKET AT A GLANCE                      

                                                                               

September 19, 2014 MADISON, WI (REPORT 38)                                         

                                                                               

CME GROUP CASH MARKETS (9/19)

BUTTER:  Grade AA closed at $3.0600.  The weekly average for Grade AA 

is $3.0220 (+.0360).  

CHEESE:  Barrels closed at $2.4300 and 40# blocks at $2.4500.  The 

weekly average for barrels is $2.4080 (+.0780) and blocks, $2.4070 

(+.0570).

BUTTER HIGHLIGHTS:  Butter production varies in the Northeast, 

while being mostly steady in the West and Central with a few areas 

experiencing higher rates in the Central region.  Most production is 

geared towards satisfying upcoming holiday demand.  Requested orders 

are higher than supplies can cover.  However, butter makers in the 

West note current prices are slowing demand.  U.S. butter prices are 

significantly higher than the global markets, causing some ingredient 

buyers to seek opportunities through importing butter.  Domestic bulk 

butter prices ranged from 3.5 cents under to 7 cents over market, with 

various time frames and averages used.  Friday at the CME Group, Grade 

AA butter closed at a new record high, $3.06, up $0.06 from last 

Friday.  The DMN National Dairy Retail Report noted the surveyed 

national weighted average price for a 1 lb. package of butter was 

$3.42, down $0.17 from two weeks ago, but $0.75 above a year ago.  

Butter surveyed prices ranged from $2.00 in the Northwest to $4.99 in 

the Northeast.  According to FAS, January-July 2014, U.S. quota butter 

imports total 10.01 million pounds, an increase of 65% compared to 

last year.      

CHEESE HIGHLIGHTS:  Cheese production is steady to building.  

There is sufficient milk and solids available to increase production, 

but manufacturers are cautious about building uncommitted inventories 

at current price levels.  The preferred course for manufacturers is to 

closely align production to orders already in hand.  Cheese demand 

continues to be very good for domestic retail sales.  Some food 

service buyers are also looking to increase purchases, but are 

reluctant to chase higher prices.  End users are also looking to 

increase barrel purchases for processing and finding stocks tight.  

The National Dairy Retail Report found weighted average prices for 

various cheese packages mixed from two weeks ago.  Combined cheese 

advertising was 18% lower than two weeks ago.  According to the 

Foreign Agricultural Service, quota imports of cheese for January-July 

2014 total 90 million pounds, 2% higher than a year ago.  At the CME 

Group, barrels closed Friday at $2.4300 and blocks at $2.4500.  

Compared to last Friday, barrels are 9.5 cents higher and blocks are 

10 cents higher.  

FLUID MILK:  Milk production varies across the U.S., as weather 

conditions and temperatures influence milk output.  The Midwest, Utah 

and Idaho, Pacific Northwest, and Arizona milk production faces 

seasonal declines.  California, New Mexico, and Southeast report some 

increase in production.  Production is steady in Florida, as well as 

the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic areas, while seasonally strong in the 

Southeast.  Processors are finding the need to redistribute quantities 

of milk supplies, as they perform seasonally scheduled maintenance 

projects.  Available cream supplies are intermittent and tight in some 

channels.  Buyers look to complete purchases prior to the upcoming 

California butterfat price release.  Butter producers wanting to 

increase production to fulfill holiday needs are seeking additional 

cream on the spot market.  Declining sales are slowing the production 

of ice cream and frozen novelties, as cream cheese and sour cream 

production divert cream supplies.  Surplus volumes of condensed skim 

are clearing to yogurt or cheese production. 

       DRY PRODUCTS:  Nonfat dry milk prices continue to move lower 

across the country.  Buyer interest is active with notable increases 

in sales.  Manufacturers are clearing condensed skim to other dairy 

outlets, prompting steady to lower nonfat dry milk production.  The 

fall baking season is generating buyer and end-user interest in high 

heat nonfat dry milk.  Dry buttermilk production is increasing, 

sparked by   seasonally active churning across the country.  Sales are 

down due to the competitive price of nonfat dry milk.  Dry whey prices 

continue to weaken, as lower export prices exert downward pressure.  

Holiday cheese volumes are boosting whey production.  Buyers are 

showing a willingness to wait to secure lower discounted prices for 

product.  Whey protein concentrate 34% prices are moving lower.  The 

market is running into some competition in the animal feed sector, as 

loads of off specification NDM clear ahead of WPC 34% destined for 

that end use.  Lactose prices are unchanged to higher, in a weak 

market.  FOB spot sale prices on unground lactose are feeling pressure 

from reseller/end user offerings.  Casein prices are unchanged.  The 

market tone is steady to weak.

       ORGANIC DAIRY MARKET NEWS (DMN):  The U.S. weighted average 

advertised price of organic milk half gallons is $3.65, up 20 cents 

from 2 weeks ago.  One year ago, the national price was $3.47.  The 

lowest price is up 71 cents to $3.29, while the top of the price range 

is up $0.80 to $4.79.  Organic cheese advertising volume continues to 

maintain high levels, surpassing ad number totals for either half 

gallons or gallons of organic milk.  Organic cheese was advertised in 

all regions except the Midwest.  All ads this period are for 8 ounce 

shredded and 8 ounce block organic cheese, all ads priced $3.99.  All 

ads for 1-pound organic butter stated a price of $3.99.  In 

comparison, while most conventional butter prices were lower than 

organic butter, some conventional butter advertised prices reached 

$4.99.

NATIONAL DAIRY RETAIL REPORT (DMN):   Cottage cheese ad numbers 

nearly tripled from two weeks ago.  The U.S. weighted average price of 

16-ounce cottage cheese, $1.79, is down 50 cents from two weeks ago 

and down 39 cents from one year ago.  Butter ad numbers are slightly 

below the level two weeks ago.  The average price, $3.42, fell by 17 

cents from the last period but is 75 cents higher than one year ago.  

Sour cream and cream cheese ad numbers are lower than two weeks ago.  

Sour cream (16 ounce) has an average price of $1.79, up 9 cents from 

the last period.  Cream cheese (8 ounce) has an average price of 

$2.00, up 21 cents.  Greek yogurt in 4-6 oz. packages averaged 95 

cents, down 5 cents from two weeks ago and one year ago.  Regular 

yogurt in 4-6 oz. packages, at 47 cents, is down 3 cents from two 

weeks ago and down 2 cents from one year ago.  Total conventional 

yogurt ad numbers increased 23%. The national weighted average cheese 

price for 8 oz. blocks is up 12 cents from two weeks ago to $2.51, 

while a year ago the price was $2.54.  The 8 oz. shred category at 

$2.52 is up 12 cents from two weeks ago and up 2 cents from one year 

ago.  Conventional cheese ads decreased 18%.  The national weighted 

average conventional milk price for half gallons, at $2.70, is 81 

cents higher than two weeks ago.  Organic half-gallon milk, at $3.65, 

is 20 cents higher than the previous period.  The organic versus 

conventional half-gallon price spread is $0.95, down 61 cents from two 

weeks ago. 

INTERNATIONAL DAIRY MARKET NEWS UPDATE (DMN):  At the September 

16 GDT event #124, average prices ranged from 6.9% lower to 1.3% 

higher from the prior event across categories. The all contracts price 

averages (US$ per MT) and percent changes from the previous average 

are:  anhydrous milk fat, $3,264 -2.2%; butter, $2,698 -2.5%; 

buttermilk powder, $3,140 -6.9%; cheddar cheese, $3,077 -6.5%; 

lactose, n.a.; rennet casein, $8,343 +1.3%; skim milk powder, $2,619 

+0.9%; sweet whey powder, $1,295 n.a.; and whole milk powder, $2,692 

+0.6%.      

       OCTOBER FEDERAL ORDER ADVANCE PRICES (FMMO):  Under the Federal 

milk order pricing system, the base Class I price for October 2014 is 

$24.19 per cwt.  This price is derived from the Advanced Class III 

skim milk pricing factor of $13.67 and the advanced butterfat pricing 

factor of $3.1410.  A Class I differential for each order's principle

pricing point (county) is added to the base price to determine the 

Class I Price.  The base Class I price increased $0.56 per cwt when 

compared to the previous month of September 2014.  For selected 

consumer products, the price changes are: whole milk (3.25% milk fat), 

$0.45 per cwt, $0.039 per gallon; reduced fat milk (2%), -$0.06 per 

cwt, -$0.005 per gallon; fat-free (skim milk), -$0.69 per cwt, -$0.060 

per gallon. The advanced Class IV skim milk pricing factor is $11.66. 

Thus, the Class II skim milk price for October 2014 is $12.36 per cwt, 

and the Class II nonfat solids price is $1.3733. The two-week product 

price averages for October 2014 are: butter $2.7652, nonfat dry milk 

$1.4766, cheese $2.3062 and dry whey $0.6747.



*****SPECIALS THIS ISSUE*****



ORGANIC DAIRY MARKET NEWS (PAGES 8-8B)

OCTOBER FEDERAL ORDER ADVANCE PRICES (PAGES 9)

DAIRY GRAPHS (G1)

NATIONAL DAIRY RETAIL REPORT (ATTACHED) 





1200CT Daniel.Johnson@ams.usda.gov 

USDA/AMS/Dairy Market News, Madison, Wisconsin

Dairy Market News website: www.ams.usda.gov/dairymarketnews

Dairy Market News database portal: www.marketnews.usda.gov/portal/da

No comments

Add new comment

(If you're a human, don't change the following field)
Your first name.
(If you're a human, don't change the following field)
Your first name.
(If you're a human, don't change the following field)
Your first name.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Welcome

to our redesigned homepage!

Scroll Down for more stories