NMPF, dairy organizations urge Senate to end farm bill debate

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Jerry Kozak, President and CEO of the National Milk Producers Federation, released the following statement urging the Senate to stop debating and pass the long-overdue farm bill:

“Milk producers need the 2013 Farm Bill enacted as soon as possible. For that reason, the National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) today joined 22 dairy organizations, along with more than 100 other farm and commodity groups around the country, in asking the Senate to cut off debate and pass the long-overdue bill on Monday.

“Farmers have now been waiting two years to know the details of the federal dairy safety net. They need this information to make business decisions. Along with the rest of American agriculture, milk producers nationwide urge the Senate—in the strongest possible terms—to vote for cloture on the farm bill Thursday.”



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Steve    
WI  |  June, 06, 2013 at 08:52 AM

Not all dairy producers want or need this bill to be passed this bill to be passed to make business decisions. What a sad day when some farmers need to rely on some government agency to make decisions for them on how much milk they can produce. The next step will be is to tell us where to sell our milk. Maybe better yet NMPF should suggest that the honorable IRS should help run this program. Why doesn't NMPF ask the dairy producers what they want instead of the just the coop leadership, who then block votes for there members.

Andy    
Hereford  |  June, 06, 2013 at 10:01 AM

Steve, I doubt that you are a Dairy farmer. The Government already controls the dairy industry. The current system provides processors with an endless supply of "below cost" tax payer subsidized Milk.

Ken    
Batavia, NY  |  June, 06, 2013 at 11:51 AM

Maybe the government should just nationalize all of the farms if the farmers can not run them profitably. Then the former owners can be made government employees and receive a guaranteed income and we do not need to have this Soviet farm bill. But then again we would be the Soviet Union after the farms were nationalized anyways. Oh what to do????? Daddy government please help us. I am so sick of overpaid lobbyists of NMPF telling us what we want!

Steve    
WI  |  June, 06, 2013 at 12:15 PM

Andy, yes I am a dairy farmer. My brother and son and I milk 400 cows and raise our own replacements and raise our own feed. We are a fourth generation family farm. Why would you suggest I am not a farmer?

Andy    
Texas  |  June, 06, 2013 at 02:32 PM

Because most producers know that coops are owed and run by "dairy farmers " And most producers should know that the DSA is voluntary. You can opt out and milk all you want.

Steve    
WI  |  June, 06, 2013 at 03:38 PM

I know coops are owned by members but doubt many are actually run by the members. I used to belong to a dairy coop that never once asked its members for there input. It was just a good old boys club and would not change. I now belong to a milk marketing coop and sell my milk to a private company. This new coop actually ask its farmers for input and does not block vote for its members.

Steve    
WI  |  June, 06, 2013 at 03:38 PM

I know coops are owned by members but doubt many are actually run by the members. I used to belong to a dairy coop that never once asked its members for there input. It was just a good old boys club and would not change. I now belong to a milk marketing coop and sell my milk to a private company. This new coop actually ask its farmers for input and does not block vote for its members.

todd    
pa  |  June, 06, 2013 at 11:13 PM

Steve, if you haven't figured it out, Andy is not a dairy farmer and all the organizations that the NMPF says support the DSA never read it. One time I saw a list of companies/organizations that support it and I did not see one dairy farm on the list. Some maybe there now, but isn't it ironic how if the NMPF says it is good companies and organizations put their name behind it even if it will hurt the dairy industry.

Andy    
Texas  |  June, 07, 2013 at 09:12 AM

Todd, yes I am a dairy farmer. In Texas. I employ 36 people and farm 2200 acres of land. I like the idea of dairymen cutting back on production in order to receive margin insurance. Instead of the current system where dairymen increase production to increase subsidies payment. It is a waste of taxpayer money.

Ken    
Batavia, NY  |  June, 07, 2013 at 09:48 AM

Sorry Andy, the MILC was capped at 2.6 million pounds. Increasing milk production above that limit would not have increased payments. So for the mega-farms this was a hard cap. But now the taxpayer will be paying for these mega farms with subsidized insurance and who knows what else. There is a reason large farmers wanted to end the MILC and the reason was so they could benefit more from the blood of the taxpayer and squeeze the last few small farms that remain. I am sure you have complained many times about the MILC payment limit.

Andy    
Texas  |  June, 07, 2013 at 10:02 AM

Todd, The MILC program cost more than the DSA. Why is a farm that supports 4 families morally superior to a family farm that supports 36 families? Perhaps it is a sense of entitlement?

steve    
new york  |  June, 07, 2013 at 04:12 PM

Andy if those 36 families reside south of the boarder than I would say the small farm that spends most of their money locally is morally superior to the mega farms that employ 36 and most of the money is sent south. As far as cost goes I think that most dairy farmers would support noting more than a pricing formula that was fair as opposed to any hand out from the government. yes let the chips fall where they may. I question wither the DSA will in the end cost less. MILC only pays when margins fall within certain ranges. DSA will cost the tax payers month after month for years maybe without the dairy farmer by ever receiving a penny. Look at LGM for dairy 55 mil in premiums paid(25 by tax payers and 30 by farmers) 1.5 mil paid to producers. So without this program dairy farmers would have had 28 mil more in their pocket.

Andy    
Texas  |  June, 07, 2013 at 06:44 PM

I agree, having nothing more than a fair pricing formula would be best. But that option is currently not on the table. As for my employees, Your assumptions about them are absurd.

steve    
new york  |  June, 07, 2013 at 08:22 PM

Then I commend you but you are the excption.


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