When we go to the doctor, we tend to listen, aware of the training, knowledge and expertise behind those letters.

“M.D.” We say, “Make me well.”

It would never occur to us to say, “Make me well the way doctors did three generations ago.” Medicine’s come a long way since then.

Biotech research in cows has yielded positive results in changing the properties of milk for human consumption.

It may be possible to cure deadly diseases as a result of similar bovine genome research.

Then there’s food. Since good nutrition is one of the building blocks of good health, I often wonder why all the angst over what is essentially the same scientific neighborhood. The activist food elite, sometimes known as “The Food Police,” is quite determined that agriculture alone, among the great technologies of the 21st Century, be denied technological advances. Clearly, biotech, or GMOs if you like, hold more promise than most.

It’s a technology that has already reaped many environmental benefits, with reductions in insecticide use and fuel.

Someone will respond to these words with the passionate belief that “GMOs have not been tested.” Clearly, that’s not true. More of the world plants this technology every year. In North America alone, we are at 3 trillion meals and counting, all served safely without even one health or environmental consequence.

It’s kind of trendy to reject science these days. But what if it’s our own health at stake? In the hospital or cooking at home, it could matter.

Moreover, some around the world without enough to eat or without the right nutrients, now have hope, thanks to biotech.

Reasonable people who give fair study to the issue pretty much have to conclude—biotech is here to stay.