ABS Moves Forward After Sexed Genetics Litigation

. ( A federal judge in Washington state has reinstated the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule. )

A jury recently found that the semen sexing technology from ABS known as Genus IntelliGen Technologies infringed two new patents owned by ST genetics related to a component of the technology called the microfluidic chip. ABS incorporated a new, non-infringing chip in the technology earlier this year which means ABS will incur no additional costs as a result of the jury verdict moving forward.

This litigation has been part of a long-running dispute between ST and ABS/IntelliGen Technologies. In 2017, a federal court found that ST held an illegal monopoly in the processing of sexed bovine semen in the U.S., permitting Genus, which owns ABS, to launch its semen sexing technology. The current patent litigation was brought by ST after the court’s prior decision.

“While disappointed in the jury decision, it’s important for our customers to know they will have no interruption in availability of Sexcel, powered by IntelliGen Technologies,” noted Nate Zwald, COO. “We are continuing to grow our offerings to meet the needs of dairy and beef producers around the world.”

Prior to the recent trial, ABS successfully invalidated or demonstrated non-infringement of five of ST’s patents.

"During this long litigation period, we have continued to improve the technology which now incorporates the non-infringing chip in our proprietary IntelliGen technology,” added Zwald. “We’re happy to have earlier succeeded in creating an open market in the sexed semen space. That has and will continue to benefit ABS customers and the industry by providing a choice in sexed semen technology. Maintaining competition in the market for the processing of sexed bovine semen is important for all dairy and beef producers.”

 
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