Barn Fire Claims 200-Year-Old New York Dairy and 46 Cows

Claiming all but one of their 47 cows, the fire destroyed 200 years of history Sunday night.
( Coon Brothers Farm - Facebook )

What started out as a normal day ended in tragedy for the owners of Millerhurst Farm in Ancramdale, N.Y. Claiming all but one of their 47 cows, the fire destroyed 200 years of history Sunday night.

“Everything was just another fine normal day on the farm,” said Michael Miller, the farms owner, in an interview with HudsonValley360. “I finished up the chores a little after 5 p.m. Everything seemed fine and normal. Apparently, that wasn’t the case.”

Getting its start in 1770, the farm was believed to be one of the oldest dairies in the state and was home to 47 cows. Only one animal survived the event.

“My wife noticed the power was flickering a little, then went out,” Miller said in the interview. “She came out and realized she saw all kinds of smoke. I initially rushed over thinking I could save some cows out of the barn, but it was engulfed in smoke so much and flames on the window edges that no one was going in there.”

Michael Molinski, a local photographer was driving home Sunday evening from a photo shoot when he caught sight of the barn wrapped in flames. Dialing 911, Molinski called the fire in with firefighters from 15 departments quickly responding to the scene.

While Miller is unsure if the family will rebuild, he remains optimistic.

“I am too young to retire,” Miller said in the interview. “The cows have been my life. I have a granddaughter — she is in tears over losing the cattle as well as I am. It’s all we want to do: live out our lives on the farm, like any farm family wants to do, and continue it all on for more generations.”

Farmers from across the state and country have offered their support on Facebook, with some writing:

A local radio station has created a Line Dance Fundraiser event to help raise money for the victims. Totaling more than $78,000 so far, a GoFundMe page has also been created for the family.

 
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