Hemp Milk: Dairy’s New Plant-Based Threat?

As the plant-based beverage market continues to grow, producers may have a new dairy-alternative threat to worry about. ( Giles Shell )

sidebar-headerV3-cannabis-web 3

As the plant-based beverage market continues to grow, producers may have a new dairy-alternative threat to worry about.

Made from the seeds of the cannabis sativa plant, a slurry of ground seeds is blended with water before going through an intense filtration process. Having a slightly nutty flavor similar to almond milk, the drink is said to have a thicker viscosity than both dairy and plant-based beverages.

NUTRITIONAL FACTS

Containing only miniscule amounts of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC,) the milk-alternative will not give consumers the psychotropic “high” typically associated with the cannabis plant. Most hemp milk producers guarantee their plants to have 0 percent THC, however, plants with a 0.3% or less THC are sometimes used.

One serving of hemp milk contains 4.7 grams of protein, standing in-between almond milk’s 1 gram and soy milk’s 7 grams. Cows’ milk, however, takes top honors with its 8 grams of protein. Like other plant-based beverages, hemp milk is often fortified with additional nutrients like calcium, phosphorus and vitamins, A, B12 and D.

A LOOK AT THE LABEL

As plant-based beverages continue to grow in popularity, consumers are becoming more aware of how these products are labeled. Food labeling has become a hot topic within the dairy industry in recent months. As a means to address these concerns, the Food and Drug Administration is looking to enforce rules on plant-based beverages and foods that claim to be traditional dairy products or “milk.”

If passed, hemp milk producers may soon need to rename this unique drink.

 
Comments